Brian Trenchard-Smith on

Devil-Ship Pirates

Released 1964
Distributor Columbia

About Devil-Ship Pirates

Like its predecessor The Pirates of Blood River, Hammer’s second pirate saga overcomes its budget restraints by setting most of the action on dry land. As usual with the studio’s forays into historical material, the innate cruelty of those unforgiving eras is given its head, leading to more than a little blood being spilled on all the lovingly fabricated finery. Indispensable Hammer stalwart Jimmy Sangster (Horror of Dracula) did the script and Hammer regulars Andrew Keir and Michael Ripper lend their typically steady support to Sir Christopher Lee, who gets to do some nifty buckling and swashing under Don Sharp’s efficient direction.

About Brian Trenchard-Smith

Brian Trenchard-Smithhas been burning to make genre films ever since seeing Hitchcock’s Vertigo at age 13. So far he has directed 42 Crimes Against Cinema, and counting. (He’s an enthusiastic recidivist.)  His cult favorites include The Man from Hong KongTurkey ShootBMX BanditsStunt RockThe Siege of Firebase Gloria. He has also made over 100 trailers ranging from Hammer horrors to Australian films of the 70′s and 80′s.   He recently directed The Cabin, a blended family romantic comedy starring Lea Thompson, which premiered on Hallmark, and Absolute Deception, a female driven suspense mystery thriller starring Academy Award winner Cuba Gooding Jr. and Emmanuelle Vaugier which is now available on DVD, PPV, and via download. He is currently shooting a quirky buddy action comedy Hard Drive with John Cusack and Thomas Jane.  Brian shares a passion for history with his wife Byzantine historian Dr. Margaret Trenchard-Smith, Ph.D.  His dream project - the true story of England's most maligned King of England, Richard the Third.  

2 Responses to Devil-Ship Pirates

  1. George White says:

    it’s the wrong trailer, it’s Pirates of Bloodriver not Devil ship pirates.

  2. Stephen Cooke says:

    Apparently Lee was fascinated with the famed French executioner Sanson, and eventually got to play him in the 1989 miniseries The French Revolution, an international co-production starring Jane Seymour as Marie Antoinette. A TV writer friend of mine got to interview him around the time it aired and said the amount of research he put into the role went way beyond the call of duty.

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