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Trailers

Adam Rifkin on

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest

1975

Dale Wasserman’s powerful play set in a mental institution was a Broadway hit with Kirk Douglas, but after many years of false starts finally ended up as a Milos Forman movie produced by Kirk’s son Michael, and starring Jack Nicholson in one of his most memorable performances.

Brian Trenchard-Smith on

Reach for the Sky

1957

Lewis Gilbert’s 1956 film about a World War II flying ace is one of the great stiff-upper-lip docudramas. Kenneth More stars as real-life hero Douglas Bader who flew numerous missions during the Battle of Britain and survived years in a POW camp. All of this on prosthetic legs. Gilbert’s crew is ace too, including Hammer Studio’s…

Podcasts

Lance Mungia

Six String Samurai writer/director Lance Mungia discusses the movies that made an impact on him with hosts Josh Olson and Joe Dante. Show Notes: Movies Referenced In This Episode Six-String Samurai (1998) The Empire Strikes Back (1980) Big Trouble In Little China (1986) Seven Samurai (1954) It Happened One Night (1934) Frankenstein (1931) King Kong…

Larry Fessenden

Writer, director, producer, editor, cinematographer, and actor Larry Fessenden chats with hosts Joe Dante & Josh Olson about some of his favorite movies. Show Notes: Movies Referenced In This Episode Habit (1995) Jakob’s Wife (2021) Phantom Thread (2017) The Last Winter (2006) Attack of the Crab Monsters (1957) The Crawling Eye (1958) The Reptile (1966)…

Nicole Holofcener

Writer, director, producer Nicole Holofcener joins podcast hosts Josh Olson and Joe Dante to discuss some of her favorite films. Show Notes: Movies Referenced In This Episode Enough Said (2013)  True Romance (1993) Coming Home (1978) Bound for Glory (1976) Hal (2018)  The Best Years Of Our Lives (1946) The Cowboys (1972) Harold And Maude…

David Arquette

Actor/Producer David Arquette joins Joe & Josh to discuss the movies that made him. Show Notes: Movies Referenced In This Episode Scream (1996) Never Been Kissed (1999) 3,000 Miles To Graceland (2001) Bone Tomahawk (2015) Spree (2020) Gremlins (1984) Muppets From Space (1999) It’s A Very Merry Muppet Christmas Movie (2002) Unforgiven (1992) The World…

Gilbert Hernandez

Legendary indie comics creator Gilbert Hernandez sits with Josh and Joe to discuss some of the more offbeat movies that made him. Show Notes: Movies Referenced In This Episode Matinee (1993) The Wolf Man (1941) Frankenstein (1931) Son of Frankenstein (1939) The Time Travelers (1964) The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957) Five Million Years To Earth/Quatermass…

Illeana Douglas

Actress/Producer/Writer/Director Illeana Douglas (Cape Fear, Ghost World, Grace of My Heart) sits with Josh and Joe to talk about her 10 all time favorite movie scenes. Show Notes: Movies Referenced In This Episode Cape Fear (1991) The Narrow Margin (1952) To Die For (1995) Grace of My Heart (1996) Ghost World (2001) Charade (1963) The…

Articles

THE LOVED ONE / BROKEN ARROW

by Charlie Largent

The Loved One  Blu-ray Warner Archives 1965 / B&W / 1:85 / / 122 min. / Street Date May 9, 2017 Starring: Robert Morse, Jonathan Winters, Anjanette Comer. Cinematography: Haskell Wexler Film Editor: Hal Ashby, Brian Smedley-Aston Written by Terry Southern, Christopher Isherwood Produced by Martin Ransohoff (uncredited), John Calley, Haskell Wexler Directed by Tony…

Lone Wolf and Cub

by Glenn Erickson

You’ll always be careful with knives after seeing the outrageous, impossibly gory violence of this brain-warping samurai series from the early 1970s. Tomisaburo Wakabayashi rolls his tiny tot Daigoro through feudal Japan, looking for trouble. There’s simply been nothing like it: breathtakingly beautiful images aestheticize bloodletting as never before or since. Lone Wolf and Cub…

The Snake Pit

by Glenn Erickson

Hollywood takes a hard look at the mundane horrors of mental asylums, and Olivia de Havilland scores another career high with her portrayal of a housewife experiencing a nervous breakdown. Some people found the show scary and a few felt it was tasteless, but Ms. de Havilland’s performance is riveting, 71 years later. Anatole Litvak’s…

The China Syndrome

by Glenn Erickson

All but inventing the ‘new liberal exposé’ suspense format, James Bridges’ smart and effective thriller began as a star showcase with a political message. Its fictional nuclear accident hit screens just before a similar real nuclear accident happened in real life, at Three Mile Island. Historical synchronicity? Box office serendipity? One thing is certain —…

The Ninth Configuration (Region B UK)

by Lee Broughton

Savant UK correspondent Lee Broughton analyzes one of his favorite pictures starring Stacy Keach, who seemed to make only cult items in the ’70s and ’80s. William Peter Blatty dishes out a thick mix of comedy and dark soul-searching about the human condition as a Caligari- insane asylum, but with new twists. The Ninth Configuration…

The Good, The Bad and The Ugly 4K

by Glenn Erickson

It’s still one of the most popular movies ever, and fans are proving that by shelling out for an umpteenth home video release, this time on the 4K Ultra HD format. Everybody knows exactly what to expect from Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef and Eli Wallach, but what about the transfer quality and encoding —…

The Rock

by Alex Kirschenbaum

After spending decades proving beyond a shadow of a doubt that he was far more than just James Bond, seven-time 007 Sean Connery decided it was safe to dust off the persona for The Rock (1996), playing former Special Air Service spy John Mason. This brilliantly batshit Michael Bay action adventure extravaganza, which has aged…

Toho Sci-Fi Double Bill

by Glenn Erickson

Mill Creek again dips into exotic Japanese sci-fi fantasy, and this time scores with the desired language choices and subtitle configurations for these spectaculars from the beginning of Toho’s strongest period. The H-Man is a stylish gangster-horror melange about a radioactive slime that cheerfully transforms Guys ‘n’ Dolls into living goo. Then, a Battle in Outer Space…

The Great Escape

by Glenn Erickson

Images from this picture were burned into our Boomer childhood brains … we actually sat still for almost three hours to watch it. John Sturges’ epic show is like a fine-tuned watch — its unbreakable story is populated by ideal characters that become instant heroes, just for acting like normal men that want free of…

Operation Crossbow

by Glenn Erickson

‘Mission impossible’  escapism about high-stakes wartime sabotage looks at an authentic, dramatic episode of WW2 — the onslaught of futuristic V-Weapons on London — and then veers into fictional fantasy (think big explosions). George Peppard toughs it out to get free of his MGM contract. Lili Palmer and Barbara Rütting do the heavy lifting, while…

Superman Serials – The Complete 1948 & 1950 Collection

by Charlie Largent

Turn of the century detectives typically dispatched the bad guys with handcuffs or handguns – commonplace but effective best practices. In 1938 the aptly named Action Comics flipped that script with a new kind of crime fighter.  This depression era RoboCop didn’t just brush off bullets – he snatched up getaway cars with one arm while corralling…

Jivaro 3-D

by Glenn Erickson

Verily, Blu-ray 3-D is better than most theatrical 3-D!  Paramount’s fourth and last 3-D production went out to theaters only in 2-D, so for all practical terms this Kino/3D Archive restoration is a depth-format premiere. Expect a kissing scene or two: lusty Fernando (¿Quién es más macho?) Lamas and demure Rhonda Fleming succumb to the…

General Idi Amin Dada: A Self-Portrait

by Glenn Erickson

Ladies and Gentlemen, we have a precedent! Barbet Schroeder’s documentary gets up close and personal with a narcissistic dictator consumed by his own ego. Idi Amin rants and raves incoherently and demands to be the center of all attention while taking his country down a road to ruin. This is Africa in 1973, where Uganda…

The Flight of the Phoenix (Region B)

by Glenn Erickson

Forgotten amid Robert Aldrich’s more critic-friendly movies is this superb suspense picture, an against-all-odds thriller that pits an old-school pilot against a push-button young engineer with his own kind of male arrogance. Can a dozen oil workers and random passengers ‘invent’ their way out of an almost certain death trap? It’s a late-career triumph for…

8 Million Ways to Die

by Glenn Erickson

Tonight on ‘movies we really want to like’ we have Hal Ashby’s final feature, an L.A.- based crime saga with a great cast and spirited direction and . . . and not much else. It isn’t the train wreck described in Kino’s candid actor interviews, but we can see only too well why it wasn’t…

Electric Boogaloo, the wild untold story of Cannon Films

by Glenn Erickson

Director and documentarian Mark Hartley scores both a film history and comedy success with this ‘wild, untold’ account of the 1980s film studio that was both revered and despised by everyone who had contact with it. The ‘cast list’ of interviewees is encyclopedic, everybody has a strong opinion, and some of them don’t need four-letter…

THE FOVC GUIDE TO THE DRIVE-IN MOVIE PART 2: AIP AND 13 NOTABLE DRIVE-IN MOVIE MASTERS

by Dennis Cozzalio

Of all the companies that produced pictures primarily for the drive-in market, none did so with as much brio or thrived because of that market with quite the tenacity and bravado of American International Pictures. Founded by former film salesman James H. Nicholson and an entertainment lawyer by the name of Samuel Z. Arkoff, AIP…

THE SMALLEST SHOW ON EARTH: IN MEMORY OF THE BIJOU (1957) AND THE ALGER (1940-2015)

by Dennis Cozzalio

The delightful British comedy The Smallest Show on Earth headlines a great Saturday matinee offering from the UCLA Film and Television Archive on June 25 as their excellent series “Marquee Movies: Movies on Moviegoing” wraps up. So it seemed like a perfect time to resurrect my review of the movie, which celebrates the collective experience…