Type to search again...

Trailers

Josh Olson on

Ghost World

2001

One of the best literary adaptions in many a moon, director Terry Zwigoff finds just the right tone for Daniel Clowes’s sweet and sour graphic novel about two teenage misfits (deftly inhabited by Thora Birch and Scarlett Johansson) and their oddball friendship with a misanthropic record collector played to a T by Steve Buscemi. The parade of oddballs who…

Podcasts

Michael Sarnoski & Vanessa Block

From Pig starring Nicolas Cage, Writer/Director Michael Sarnoski and Writer/Producer Vanessa Block join Josh and Joe to discuss the movies that inspired them during the creation of their film. Show Notes: Movies Referenced In This Episode Nobody (2021) Infested (2002) The Big Chill (1983) A History of Violence (2005) Pig (2021) Mandy (2018) John Wick…

Pandemic Parade 7: Quarantine Harder

Make way for the parade! Featuring Brian Trenchard-Smith, Eli Roth, Katt Shea, Thomas Jane, our very own Don Barrett and Blaire Bercy from the Hollywood Food Coalition. Please support the Hollywood Food Coalition. Text “Give” to 323.402.5704 or visit https://hofoco.org/donate! Show Notes: Movies Referenced In This Episode Screams of a Winter Night (1979) Goodbye Bruce…

Articles

Moonstruck

by Glenn Erickson

  Criterion refreshes a bona fide classic with a new remaster and makes their release especially attractive with some well-chosen extras that give us first-person input from writer John Patrick Shanley and star Cher. The show isn’t technically a holiday movie but it plays really well at family gatherings. Heck, even Cher says ‘she can…

The Hot Rock

by Glenn Erickson

Donald Westlake’s lovably luckless crook John Dortmunder is brought to life by Robert Redford, in a lightweight crime caper engineered by top talent: screenwriter William Goldman and director Peter Yates. Redford’s partner is a worrisome, talkative George Segal; Moses Gunn is the unhappy client, Ron Liebman a jolly master of all things technical and Zero…

Little Murders

by Glenn Erickson

The blackest of black comedies confronts us with an urban worst case scenario — Jules Feiffer’s ‘social horror’ movie is like a sitcom in Hell, with citizens numbed and trembling over the unending meaningless violence. What was nasty satire in 1971 now plays like the 6 o’clock news. Too radical for its time, Feiffer and…

THE WONDERFUL WORLDS OF RAY HARRYHAUSEN, VOLUME TWO: 1961-1964

by Charlie Largent

Indicator follows up The Wonderful Worlds of Ray Harryhausen, Volume One: 1955-1960 with, wait for it, Volume 2: 1961-1964, featuring three of Harryhausen’s most ambitious productions. Good news for fans, the UK company delivers another robust box set with beautiful transfers and an abundance of extras including newly produced interviews, a small treasure trove of promotional…

Prizzi’s Honor

by Glenn Erickson

Richard Condon and John Huston’s show is like a gangland version of Moonstruck, bouncing effortlessly between earnest romanticism and cynical satire. Hit man Jack Nicholson is a brass-knuckle Romeo, and Kathleen Turner’s mysterious bicoastal Juliet has nothing but surprises for him. Near the end of his career, Huston’s direction is as assured as can be….

Joe versus the Volcano

by Glenn Erickson

“May you live to be a thousand years old, sir.” Still the most widely unheralded great movie on the books, John Patrick Shanley’s lightweight/profound fable is an unmitigated delight. See Tom Hanks at the end of the first phase of his career plus Meg Ryan in an unacknowledged career highlight. How can a movie be…

Stanley & Iris

by Glenn Erickson

  Stanley & Iris Blu-ray Twilight Time 1990 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 104 min. / Street Date January 17, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95 Starring: Jane Fonda, Robert De Niro, Swoosie Kurtz, Martha Plimpton, Harley Cross, Jamey Sheridan, Feodor Chaliapin. Cinematography: Donald McAlpine Original Music: John Williams Written…

Tell Me That You Love Me, Junie Moon

by Glenn Erickson

Troubling fact: the great director Otto Preminger’s worst film is not Skidoo. Three physical misfits form an alternative family as a defense against the world. It’s a good idea for a movie, but the writer and director do just about everything wrong that a writer and director can do. Tell Me That You Love Me,…